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in the united states, i have to be honest with you. i love the united states, i admire the united states. >> rose: and you're heavily invested here. >> yes, the united states is the leader of the world. it's going to be the leader of the world for many years to come. forget china's going to come out you're down. >> rose: that means? >> when you have a country has $14 trillion of cumulative debt and its g.d.p. around $14 million and both competing, that's not good. >> rose: debt or g.d.p.? >> yes. and when you have a budget deaf sit of a trillion dollars going for the foreseeable fueler, it's unacceptable. when you have economic vices that hit you badly and it was contagious, things are not we were there but you can get out of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bin talal for the hour next. ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. he's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him as one of the world's 25 most wealthiest people. "time" magazine
shows the global imbalance, which has more to do with fiscal policies in the united states, the household savings rates in the united states and the distortions in china, which inflates their savings rate artificially. that has to do with the international exchange. the international exchange is essentially a way for these economies to be adapting to the pressures and these distortions, which really have to do with the domestic policy. >> since the issue is so important and so treacherous, i would like to ask if the other panelists have any comments for this question. >> let me complain about this component, the most concerning aspect of this is in the financial sector. this is being promoted by many people in the official sector, who say that one way to make the system safer is to do this. this is, in a way, very understandable because of the problems that many of the smaller countries or dealing with. if we go down this route and we have protectionism with financial services, this will carry with it some bad implications. the least of which is that much of the growth in t
at a still unfolding economic disaster. the united states goes after al qaeda in yemen. we will talk about it on our roundtable tonight. and who says the news business is dead? in taiwan, they're drawing new viewers by animating it all. >>> from the different perspectives of reporters and analysts from around the world, this is "worldfocus." major support has been provided by rosalind p. walter and the peter g. peterson foundation, dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. and additional funding is provided by the following supporters -- >>> good evening. welcome to "worldfocus." i'm daljit dhaliwal in new york. we begin tonight with the global economy and news of the key economic barometer, unemployment. in this country, the government said today it held steady at 10% last month as moyers cut 85,000 jobs which was more than expected. the news was disappointing in europe. in the 16 countries that used the euro as their currency, the jobless wrought was also 10%. in this case, for the month of november, up from 9.9% in octob
of the united states military is we grow and develop people. i mean i've had dozens of these interviews with people, okay, you're getting a few job. this is turning over a new leaf. this is a time to go get it. we've seen people turn their lives around. this is one of the great things about our institution. so clearly these are issues that the policymakers have to come to grips with. our task was put the spotlight on policies, weaknesses, gaps, that's what we have tried to do. i do believe there may be places where barriers should be retained in some way. >> and maybe for some. >> for some purpose. >> maybe promotions or -- >> exactly. >> whether it's a security issue. >> exactly. but what i'm suggesting is that people who are responsible for these policy decisions know what the vital dots look like. they know where they come from. as i -- the report said and in my earlier testimony, the time has passed for us to be having the turf wars on who owns the information. >> i couldn't agree with you more. this is a major challenge for all of us in the senate and house and committee and being
worry that the united states may sink into deflation and that was one consequence of the rate hitting zero bound. limiting the scope. those decisions in this period were faced with the risk of hitting zero-bound, policy makers should control the rates and being constrained by the lower bound on the policy interest rate. although these were warranted in policies in subsequent years, the question remains if the policy was necessary. since we cannot know how the economy would evolve under policies, the answer to this question is conjectual. one approach by this question is to compare policies during this period and the recommendations from the taylor rule, developed by john taylor of stanford university. this approach is subject to a number of indications. notably simple policy rules like the taylor rule are only rules of thumb and important people can disagree about the details of such rules. moreover simple rules may leave out factors that may be relevant such as the risk of the policy rate hitting zero-bound. which is why we don't make policy based on such rules alone. for these reaso
interference even as the united states reportedly is more deeply involved than ever in secret military missions there. >>> united states and russia move closer to a new deal to reduce nuclear arm. has president obama succeeded in the resetting relations with moscow? >>> on the 65th anniversary of the liberation of the auschwitz nazi death camp, we will show you how survivors are coping all these years later. >>> and the smash hit "avatar" makes its way to china. it's that or a new film about the life of confucius. >>> from the different perspectives of reporters and analysts from around the globe, this is "worldfocus." major support has been provided by rosalind p. walter and the peter g. peterson foundation, dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. and additional funding is provided by the following supporters -- >>> good evening. i'm daljit dhaliwal in new york. we begin tonight with the issue of terrorism and the escalating battle against it in yemen. shortly after the attempted bombing of the u.s. jetliner on christmas day,
the global public square." welcome and happy new year to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a terrific show for you naturally involving the attempted christmas bombing in the united states. before we get to it, i want to give you some of my own thoughts about that attempted terrorist attack. senator dianne feinstein says that she believes the united states government should overreact rather than underreact to these kinds of events. isn't that exactly backwards? the purpose of terrorism is not to kill the few hundred that are attacked, but to terrorize the tens upon tens of millions who watch. terrorism is unique as a military strategy and it defends for its effectiveness on the response of the society for it to work, all of us have to respond with fear and hysteria. so far we're doing just that. i don't mean to suggest by this that the system worked, obviously, it didn't. when u.s. officials got information from the terrorist father, they should have immediately checked if he had a visa or put him on a no-fly list. they should not have
viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. centrally involving the attempted christmas bombing in the united states, before we get to it, i want to give you some of my own thoughts about that attempted terrorist attack. senator dianne feinstein says that she believes the united states government should overreact rather than underreact to these kinds of events. isn't that exactly backwards? the purpose of terrorism is not to kill the few hundred that are attacked. but to terrorize the tens upon tens of millions who watch. terrorism is unique as a military strategy and that it depends for its effectiveness on the response of the society. for it to work all of us have to respond with fear and hysteria. so far we are doing just that. i don't meaning to suggest by this that the system worked. obviously it didn't. when u.s. officials got information from the terrorist's father they should have immediately checked if he had a visa and hut him on a no-fly list and not allowed him to enter an airplane with a bomb, makeshift bomb. these are all mistakes and should be fi
, fancially, with the crisis you'r in rit now, new a mess. new a mess in t united states, i have to be hones with you. i love the united states, admire the united ates. >> rose: a you're heavily invested here. >>es, the united stateis the leader othe world. it's gng to be the leader of the wod for many years to come. foet china's goin to come out you're down. rose: that means? >> when yohave a country has $14 trilli of cumulative debt anits g.d.p. around $14 millioand both competing, that's notood. >>ose: debt or g.d.p.? >> yes. and when you have a budget deaf sit of a trillion dollars going for the foreseeab fueler, it's unacceptable. when you have economic ces that hit you badly andt was contagio, things are not we were the but you can get o of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bi talal for the ur next. ( coca-cola 5-note mmonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communicaons from our studios in w york city, is is charlie rose. rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. 's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him asne of the wod's 25ost wlthiest ople. "tim mazine dubbed him th
with you. i love thenited states, i mire the united states. >> rose: and you're heavily invested he. >> yes,the united states is t leader of the world. it's going to be t leader of the world formany years to come. forget china's going to come out you'reown. >> rose: thameans? >> when you have a coury has $14 trillion of cumulive debt and its g.d.p. around $14 million and both competin that's not good. >> rose: debt or d.p.? >> yes. and wn youave a buet deaf sit of a trillion dolrs going for the foreseeable fuer, it's unacceptable. when you he economic vices that hit youadly and it was contagious, things a not we were the but you can get o of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bi talal for the ur next. ( coca-cola 5-note mmonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communicaons from our studios in w york city, is is charlie rose. rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. 's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him asne of the wod's 25ost wlthiest ople. "tim mazine dubbed him the arabian warren buett. his fi has major stakes in banks, hotel and mea coanies. his largest vestment is i
, there will be less of a demand for the labor coming into the united states. >> we have time for one more quick question. the gentleman in the back? >> this is for the author of the study. i am a little bit perplexed about how to describe the late 1980's, when this was implemented, as weaker labor demand. unemployment was at a high level in 1982 at 10%. the average was 7.5% in 1982 and continued to go down into 1991. the immediate implementation was a time of strong labor market growth. >> like to put up the graft, but from 1988 until 1991, is when we do see unemployment rates growing from about 5.8%. . unemployment rate going up from about 5.8% to about 7.8%. so it was exactly during that period of time with growing unemployment that occurred, that's basically what doomed the second term for george bush, exactly during this period of time when the legalization took place. so i think that it's -- we had a weakening labor market. we had a growing unemployment rate exactly during the moment when we saw not only legalization take place but these wage increases taking place and this movement -- thi
of threat to the united states. both got hit by a big disaster, and i think both responded very, very positively. i think -- i don't disagree with a single thing the president said that he was doing better. in the future, when someone like this guy's father comes into an embassy, we won't just make a little note about it, we're going to pull his visa and see to it that he doesn't get on an airplane. but i think there are a couple of things that the president didn't say that i wish he had talked about. we now know that these terrorists are almost all young male muslims from about a dozen countries. it seems to me that we ought to at least begin a certain degree of profiling. and say that every such person gets special kinds of screening before they get on a plane coming to the united states when they are not citizens of the united states itself. that's number one. and number two, he didn't change his view on whether or not someone like this guy should be charged in a criminal court and given fifth amendment rights. i'm convinced that he should first be treated as an enemy combatant and
and united states are going to continue to cooperate so as to be more effective in preventing radical islamic terrorism and prosecuting it when it arises. we shared information with secretary napolitano. and in due course, people spoke and your contributed to that debate. we also came up with an joint statement. it's a eu-u.s. statement. it's an important resolution. it's based on aviation security in particular. and you'll get that text at the end of this press conference. we mention a number of points that are dear to us all. we're talking here about the risk of terrorists, basically the same risk on both sides of the -- i think we want to protect our principals and values. our way of life. and those attacks of course by terrorism. we also share -- say that we share responsibility for fighting terrorism to ensure safety and security for our citizens. i think we all share many of these international values. we talk about a number of objectives and measures. objectives have a lot to do with aviation security. if we've learned anything from the spoiled attack over detroit is that flighted stil
in the united states had to be ground and because of money and power and they always say van dare was like family to bush. we're dealing with these leaders that making deals back home deals with people and then all of the sudden they come back you know and roost here and then you wonder why we're being attacked. we're spending our own money to give this money to these people for energy to come back and kill us with our own money. when we going to wake up? you know? it's like we're being directed in one way and then when we make deals with these people they're suppose to be the good guy and look what happens. host: thanks for the call. "washington post" says al qaeda benefits for decades worth of miss stepped in yemen. first of all u.s. commandos are trained encounter tactics. many say the war could arrive too late to change the trajectory in yemen. since the u.s.s coal attacked the nation has been past toward the illusion that the government is weak to control swats in the country. it's stretched thin and separatist movement in the south. it's got high employment unemployment rate and al
been this delay. >> the former president of the united states, bill clinton, take it, has been spending time with the president today at the white house. what do weigh know about this? >> you know, it is interesting because we saw him come here to the white house to have a meeting with the president. we asked about that when we saw him arrive here. we were told that he came and was simply in town. and came here to stop by and meet with the president and also meet with other officials here at the white house. we don't know if he's still here. . beyond that we don't know anything else about that meeting. it does seem interesting the timing of this while this is all taking place, the former president, bill clinton did come by the white house. >> stand by. we will be getting back to you. once again, we are awaiting the president. he's supposed to come out around 4:30 p.m. eastern, 27 minutes or so from now. let's bring in our -- our panel, national security contributor, fran townsend, former homeland security adviser to president bush. also with us, national security analyst peter bergen. s
on the united states, for sure we should have cancelled his visa instead of saying, well, we'll look at his visa again after it's expired. because the results of that was 300 people on the plane almost expired. so this is a very big wake-up call. and the first place we should wake up is to toss out the views of the so-called privacy advocates who have been hangin' around the fringes of this question for the last five years, a body scan with the technology today doesn't invade anybody's privacy. you can't tell whether it's a man or a woman. >> but yet it's these privacy groups, governor, that still make a big deal of it. we're just getting word that the minneapolis airport. more on that. we'll let you know but it's on the heels of this disruption in newark a couple days ago. but what keeps happening here? >> the congress needs to stand up to these folks and say, hey, mandatory patdowns are a bigger invasion of privacy than the body scan. i would hope that the president of the united states tells people today that there will be mandatory body scans on every domestic polite in the united states and
to strike the united states and were recruiting operatives to do so. the intelligence community did not aggressively follow up and prioritize streams of information related to a possible attack against the homeland. second, this contributed to a larger failure analysis, a failure to connect the dots of intelligence that existed across our intelligence community and which together could have revealed that abdul mutallab was planning an attack. third, this in turn fed into shortcomings in the watch listing system which resulted in this person not being placed on the no-fly list, thereby, allowing him to board that plane in amsterdam for detroit. in summary, the u.s. government had the information scattered throughout the system to potentially on the cover this plot and disrupt the attack rather than of failure to collect or share intelligence, this was a failure to connect and understand the intelligence that we already had. and that is why we took swift action in the days following christmas, including updating the terrorist watch list system and adding more individuals to the no-fly
to the united states. meanwhile in yemen, several other countries restricted public access to their embassies today joining the united states and britain. in tonight's lead focus, we have more on the situation in yemen from our german partner. >> reporter: cement barriers block access to the u.s. embassy which has been closed indefinitely. u.s. national security adviser john brennan said the closure was a response to threats from al qaeda. >> i looked at the intelligence that's available as far as the plans for al qaeda to carry out attacks, possibly against our embassy, possibly against u.s. personnel. decided it was the prudent thing to do to shut the embassy but we're working very closely with the yemeni authority to address the threat that's out there. it just demonstrates that al qaeda is determined to carry out these attacks and we're determined to thwart those attacks. >> reporter: yemen is one of the poorest and most politically unstable coue middle east. in recent years, it has become a breeding ground for terrorists. u.s. officials believe they were behind the failed attempt to brin
focus by the united states on the problems of terrorism and in giving assistance to the government of yemen and following 2003 when there was a sense that al qaeda had been defeat indeed yemen, much of that dropped off. the amount 06 attention, the amount of resources that we gave to yemen dropped off significantly. and since 2006, with the reconstitution of al qaeda in yemen, only platedly has the united states sort of focused again on the problem there and of course the reason why we're talking about it this morning is because omar farooq aomar that took took omar farooq kathwari was coming from yemen. caller: my question is how long have we been with this war against yemen? i mean, i don't mean to go to a conspiracy theory but i read in ha general petraeus and another went down there so when tough head of arms services committee go to yemen, they are not just going to see if it's -- >> well, i wouldn't characterize it at all as a war in yemen. and senator mccain is my former boss. i worked for him for 5 1/2 years on foreign policy and so i can state categorically what was on his
there is not dissimilar from the screening in the united states, and the screening that abdulmutallab went through was not that dissimilar. we want more explosive detection, more technology. other airports have resisted some of those items, because of other concerns that they have about privacy, for example. this incident is serving as a catalyst to reopen that dialogue, particularly with the airports and countries where we have a large throughput of passengers to the united states. >> i want to get back to that. i assume that there will be another round of questioning. i was shipped off of this to something else why have you here. we all know what has happened in haiti over the last seven to 10 days, it has been devastating. there is an issue about adoption potential, haiti children who had been left without parents. we have about five families here who have completed paperwork to get the children from haiti. and yet they are being held up. i need to get a commitment from you that the citizenship and immigration services will work with my office to help expedite our ability to get those kids out.
starts now. >>> we're supposed to be seeing new procedures for folks flying to the united states. but are airports following the rules? tonight checking on your security situation. and why your treatment will depend not only on where you're from, but where you've been. but following a green beret as he goes off to war. >> i feel more nervous more for her and the kids. >> tonight one man's mission and the impact on those left behind. and a tremendous accomplishment. teams finally unveil the tallest structure that man has ever created. today a deadly shootout inside a federal building in las vegas. investigators say a man wearing black walked into the lobby of a federal courthouse, pulled out a shotgun from his jacket and opened fire. all of the video from that incident in just a moment. seven u.s. marshalls and security officers later responded with a hail of bullets. one court officer is dead tonight. a deputy u.s. marshal is in the hospital tonight and the gunman was shot and killed. so why did he do it? now we've learned he was upset because he lost a lawsuit. more on the motiv
at those the washington post. calling for allowing haitians in the united states who are here illegally to find work. "the new york times" echoing "the washington post." the first phone call comes from chris on independent mine in ohio. good morning. caller: the morning. everybody keeps getting -- host: go ahead, we can hear you. caller: pat robertson was right. it did -- they did sell their souls to the devil. not that we should not help -- we should help. they went with the french -- now they're asking americans to save us. host: what part of history are you saying? caller: pat roberts and back -- said back in 1761, i think, that they chose to sell their souls to the devils -- the french, communist, but they are begging us to help. we cannot even support ourselves. we are getting ripped off by our own government. how can we support them, too? i don't understand -- we are starving to death and, yes, i understand it was a natural disaster but it was not our fault and that understand we should help, there is no problem with that, but why is it we are starving to death, too. host: what ab
first bill signing as president of the united states, president obama was upholding justice ginsburg's interpretation of the law in the dissent she filed in the 2007 decision. [applause] she once noted that dissents speak to a future age, the greatest dissents do become the dominant view. so that's the dissenter's hope, she said. they are writing not for today, but for tomorrow. and that is exactly what happened in this case. i was serving as the chief of staff to the first lady in the clinton administration when president clinton announced the nomination of justice ginsburg as only the second woman to the highest court. he said at the time that she was brilliant, had a compelling life story whose record was interesting. she was independent, progressive, but we were cheering because she was a champion for women's rights. the justice and i share a very, very dear friend. national public radio's legal correspondent for the supreme court, nina totenberg. nina reminded me that justice ginsburg began her crusade for gender equality in partnership with her husband marty, with whom she shar
-election to the united states senate. on each of these occasions, i have begun my remarks by observing that every important journey in life begins and ends at home. today is no exception. what is different about today, however, is not to announce the beginning of yet another campaign for the united states senate, but rather to announce that after 35 years of representing the people of connecticut and the united states congress, i will not be a candidate for re-election this november. i want to begin these very brief remarks by expressing my deepest gratitude to the wonderful people of connecticut for the remarkable privilege of being elected eight times over the past four decades to our national assembly. you have honored me beyond words with your confidence. let me quickly add that there have been times when my positions and actions have caused some of you to question that confidence. i regret that. but it is equally important that you know that i have never wavered in my determination to do the best job for our state and our nation. i love my job as your senator. i always have, still do. howeve
requirements for individuals lying to the united states. every individual applying to the united states from anywhere in the world who has an itinerary are passed for from nations that are sponsors of terrorism or countries of interest are in charge go through -- are required to go through enhanced screening. others will go through random threat based enhanced screening. at airports throughout the u.s. we have airport law enforcement officials and security measures but seen and unseen. i want to express our thanks for the traveling public for their patience with the increased security measures. i want to thank the department of homeland security personnel who have been engaged on a day- to-day basis to implement them since christmas. today i would like to describe to you five of the recommendations that are included in our report to the president. first, there needs to be an evaluation and modification of the criteria and process used to create the terrorist watch list. this will involve the border, and security and other members of the intelligence community. the effort will include evaluat
in the history of the united states in the last administration after we got hit on 9/11, we had to form the department of homeland security because all of these agencies -- the cia, the fbi, the national security agency, local law enforcement, nobody could talk to one another. so here we are. did that work? did that really work or was this just the due diligence of american bureaucracy just not working? what happened here? oh, but we got to pin it on obama. we can't wait to pin it on him because he's weak on terror. you know, when this is all washed out, we are going to find out -- and we'll dig out the sound bites because they're in the archive. i remember joe lieberman, oh, we just have to have the rearrangement of government so we can protect america. i remember all that. i remember dick cheney coming out and saying that we have to do this because we're going to get hit again, that we just -- well, can we just say this? we kind of got lucky on christmas day, that there were some people that got after it and it was a failed attempt? but we knew about the red flags, we had the intel, i
heading to the united states, something our audience already was well familiar with. >> regarding the report specifically on the christmas incident, we were told by general jones that it would contain shocking information. as it turns out, i couldn't find anything new in there. what do we though about how much of it is still classified? >> reporter: we don't know how much remains classified. we may never know that. what we do know is this process today was delayed twice. the president was originally supposed to talk to us at 1:00 a.m., then 3 p.m ultimately it was 4:30 p.m why? because of a rather intensive debate about what to keep classified and what to declassify. what we do learn is that there was a fundamental break down in this new system of applied and created after 9-11. the c.i.a. and the national counterterrorism center are supposed to deal with each other and deal with each other rapidly and cooperatively. that didn't happen. let me read one key part of the report that talks about this break down. quote, the intentional redundancy in the system should have added an addi
president obama restored the united states prestige or damaged it with apologies? listen. (cheers) >> i will restore our moral standing so america is once again that last best hope for all who are called to the cause of freedom. >> president obama em barks on the first european swing focused on the languishing glowing economy. >> if you look at the source of this crisis the united states certainly has some accounting to do with respect to a regulatory system that was inadequate, the massive changes that have taken place in the global financial system. >> after already apoll guysing for sending the global recession partially in motion the president also apologized for america looking down on europe. >> in america there's a failure to appreciate europe's leading role in the world. instead of celebrating your dynamic union and seeking to partner with you to meet common challenges there have been times where america has shown arrogance and been dismissive, even derissive. >> can i ask you whether you prescribe as many of the predecessors have to the school of american exceptionalism that se
the politics of this in the united states are going to force this administration to draw down substantially before 2012. one thing i think is certain, we certainly will not have achieved lasting security change, if that's the case. what i do think is this, i think that by mid 2011, we will have a pretty good idea whether or not this strategy, the mcchrystal strategy, the obama strategy, has a chance of succeeding. if by the middle of 2011, which will be 12 months after we've gotten all of the forces or at least most of the forces in the theater, we've ramped up civilian advisers to around 1,000 or so at beginning of 2009 we've begun working regional diplomacy. if by mid 2011 we don't see any sign of change, then we've learned something. the patient was dead. president obama inherited a dead patient on the table. and we cannot rebuild the avenue -- afghan state. if that's the case, we're in a difficult situation. there's no simple, let's say let's all come home. pretend it's not a problem. more will probably not be the answer. staying on indefinitely will not be the answer. and quitting will
.org. >>> in yemen where the plot was planned, the united states has reopened its embassy after it was closed for two days because of security concerns. u.s. officials say successful counter terrorism operations by yemen had allowed them to resume operations. however, yemen's interior ministry issued its own statement, saying that the security situation in the capital had always been under control. and yemeni security officials say the government has sent thousands of troops to take part in a campaign against al qaeda in three provinces in recent days. as we have seen, the united states has been emphasizing an increasingly cooperative relationship with yemen in the last few days. underscored by comments over the weekend by president obama and a visit to yemen by general david petraeus. the commander of u.s. forces in the region. however, the "washington post" reports today that senior yemeni officials are playing down the partnership, fearing that the government could pay a heavy political price for aligning itself with the united states and appearing too weak to control al qaeda by itself. the artic
virginia. it is a huge room filled with computers. it is basically the brain of the united states intelligence system. any tip -- it was created after september 11. this was the place that was supposed to answer the 9/11 commission report on the failure to connect the dots. this is the place. this is one of its first big tests. this is a place in northern virginia were all the data comes in. there's not a single agency that is supposed to run the show entirely. it's under the office of the director of national intelligence. it is under the director. it is not any single persons jurisdiction. all the different agencies are supposed to be participating. they are all supposed to share the data and make sure they do not miss things. in design, it is supposed to do exactly what it should have done here. it did not. why? i do not know the answer. caller: good morning. in the regulatory world, there's a thing called root cause analysis when a problem occurs. you look to find out what the true systemic cause of the problem was. when i look at what i know, this was not a system failure. th
checkpoint in every domestic and foreign airport that has a plane bound for the united states. >> also a brief look back. >> it all comes down to the state of florida. >> and a cautious look ahead. where is the economy headed? >> the worst is definitely over. captioned by the national captioning institute -- www.ncicap.org -- >> on december 16, 2009, a young nigerian man bought a plane ticket in ghana. he paid almost $3,000 in cash. he gave no contact information. didn't give an address. same young man was on a british watch list andast may the british had banned him from entering the u.k. in november of 2009, the same young man's father, one of the most prominent men in my year yeah, had warned the american em wassy about his son and met with a c.i.a. agent to talkbout his concerns. nonetheless the young man board add plight in amsterdam, he lad explosives in his underwear, boarded a northwest airlines flight bound for detroit and just before landing he tried to light the explosives after which he was subdued by passengers and nightcap. at first the secretary of homeland security said
the american people, seized the air-traffic system, causing the united states to spend much more money on screening and personnel. suggesting again to the american people that their government cannot protect them. these are choices between bad actions. host: let's hear from one of the callers. ernest, good morning. independent line. caller: sir, i want to find out if you are one of the good cia guys. you say we are not -- you say that we are fighting an enemy that does not exist. al qaeda is a name that we gave them, they did not give it to themselves. i do not know how in tune you are with the last attempt of a terrorist attack. could you explain to the people what a false flag operation is? then i would like to know this -- during the reporting of the past terrorist attack, eyewitness accounts have been suppressed. we are talking about the well- dressed gentleman that helped the accused hijacker or bomber to get on the plane, past security, by passing it all with no passport, no identification, no visa. we are talking about the gentleman that was on the flight the entire time. host:
that a nigerian was being prepared for attacks in the united states on the homeland. my understanding is the least one of those intersects i think there were several specifically mentioned umar farouk abdulmutallab, the first two names. if you put it together with the fact this suspect's own father and not just anyone off the street as it has been stated by some in the intelligence community but a respected nigerian banker went physically to the embassy and talked to not one agency but to, the department and central intelligence agency and wasn't in missing person report. he said he was conservative his son, he's in yemen, and the nsa intercepted background. follow those meetings with written communications and telephone calls. we know that yemen is a hotbed of terrorism. apparently intelligence community didn't receive a possibility al qaeda and the arab peninsula might attack the homeland which is the story is another failure of imagination and it seems al qaeda is fixation on aviation system all of it seems to me not just in retrospect but before the effect of to have been enough to put on high
's name was the reason no one realized he had a visa to enter the united states which should have set alarm bells ringing. according to this official, one letter was dropped from mr. abdulmutallab's name when an employee cross-checked his name against a government database. this happened back on november 20th. had mr. abdulmutallab's name been entered correctly, officials apparently would have seen that he was classified as a possible terrorist and then the fact that he also had a visa to enter the united states would have kicked him over into what they call a 3-b classification. a 3-b classification would have kept him from boarding the plane. one letter in his name. the fact that the failures in this case have been narrowed down to that level of detail gives you some idea of how intense the security reviews have been over the last few days. in his remarks today, president obama also vowed to redouble u.s. efforts to defeat al qaeda. >> here at home we will strengthen our defenses, but we will not succumb to a siege mentality that sacrifices the open society and liberties and values
on election 2010. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> i am less interested in passing out blame than i am in learning from and correcting these mistakes to make us safer. for ultimately the buck stops with me. as president i have a solemn responsibility to protect our nation and our people and when the system fails, it is my responsibility. >> president obama taking responsibility this week for america's closest brush with airline terror in years. he suggested no one will be fired at least for now and he ordered a series of reforms including tougher rules for putting people on the no fly list, and more widespread distribution of intelligence reports. the president also renewing his declaration of war on al qaeda and its growing presence in yemen. cnn international security correspondent paula newton is in yemen for us. we'll go to her in a moment. also here in washington are our homeland security correspondent jeanne meserve and former homeland security inspector general clark kent irvin. thanks to al
going to come to the fore. i think independents might. in many states in the united states today, there are more registered independents or unenrolled or the states have different names for them. who are not affiliated with either party. and i think there are more people -- i'm not the only person who is fed up with the high level of partisanship, and i think, you know, there have already been independents elected governors in some states, some local communities are getting rid of party designations for, you know, races for mayor and city council, so i think we may see slowly perhaps a rise of the independents politically. >> thank you. >> hi, i'm from washington jefferson college. you actually already answered two of my questions, but i guess i was wondering, since barack obama already, you know, tried to enhance the role of the congress, by letting them do what they're supposed to do, do you think that he will continue this encouragement and have them keep doing what they're supposed to do or do you think that the criticism of what he tried to do will maybe stop him in the futu
him into the united states and britain. so this is the kind of threat where it's maybe an individual now rather than in one particular cell that al qaeda can utilize in this type of aircraft attack. >> there's still a lot of unfinished work today-to-do for the obama administration in reforming the way intelligence is shared inside the u.s. bureaucracy for looking at the problem of signal to noise in the system, wrefb information is shared, how do you distinguish reliable and important information from false reporting and misleading reporting. there's... anyone who works in the system who deals with threat reporting testifies that there is an enormous amount of noise in the system. and even if you share the noise, that doesn't actually create the clarity you need to act against real threats. >> yemen is a country's in great chaos at the moment. there's a civil war in the north draining off a lot of military resources at the moment. there's a separate insurgency which is increasingly violent in the south. the government is running out of money as it loses oil exports and so i think wha
to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, january 21, 2010. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform te duties of the chair. signed: robert c. byrd, presidet pro tempore. mr. mcconnell: madam president? the presiding officer: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: i want to thank the majority leader for giving me the chance to make my very brief opening remarks as i must leave the building shortly. i thank him. mr. president, the senate's newest member is coming down from massachusetts today and we'll have a chance to welcome senator-elect brown to the capitol. obviously, we're delighted to have him. senator-elect brown has captured the attention of the entire country, but he has captured the attention of massachusetts voters
into this al qaeda narrative that says that islam -- the united states is at war with islam. we have to be very careful. it's that narrative that feeds the ranks and builds the ranks of al qaeda. >> reporter: this afternoon, the council on american/islamic relations said the new guidelines amount to racial profiling, though the tsa says the majority of all travelers come to the u.s. will get enhanced screening, not just those from the 14 countries named. wolf? >> do you get the sense this is just the latest step that more are on the way? >> this is definitely an evolutionary process. they want to take some steps immediately. there will be reevaluations, new intelligence that come in, and things will change, i'm sure. >> thank you, jeanne. >>> let's get to the white house where the terror threat is the president's most urgent priority. he's back from vacation. our dan lothian is standing by. dan, the president is getting some high-level briefings today, getting ready for a full-scale meeting with his top advisers tomorrow? >> reporter: he is, wolf. first of all, the president getting an update f
to be a sustained policy after the first action, does the united states then support future actions or does it say never again, that this cannot occur again? all the while dealing with the aftermath of then is really strike and the implications that entail. finally, if this does not come to pass, and iran, diplomacy does not work in israel does not strike then we are going to be focusing a large part of the coming year and afterwards on confidence-building and reassurance among our allies as we try to build a containment regime to deal with nuclear iran. i would raise the question one of the main challenges we will face in confidence building is how to convince the allies that a country that was unable to prevent iran from achieving the outcome we defined as unacceptable, that is acquiring nuclear weapons, will also be able to have the willpower and resolve to deter nuclear iran and we will face challenges in our theater engagement strategy and trying to build a containment architecture to do with nuclear iran if that comes to pass. just a couple of quick comments about the whole issue of strategi
students from all over the united states. i've been associated with this program as faculty director for about 10 years. and this is a program which is very dear to my heart. and we have consistently had some of the best, most authoritative speakers available. and cerda, this is true of juan zarate. there is a scene in the 1975 movie about the watergate invasion, all the presidents men. and there's a meeting in an underground washington garage and watch how holbrook, playing an informant known by the name of deep throat, tells robert redford playing bob warburg, the "washington post" reporter, that if he wants to find out who is responsible for the water great burglary, at democratic party headquarters, at the watergate, you should follow the money. well, we have some here today who has followed money. in his capacity as deputy assistant secretary of the treasury. and this was a job that really involves one of the most complex tasks in the antiterrorism effort. that have these people get their money, how they spend their money, and it takes a person with uncommon diligence and uncomm
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